Friday, 20 November 2015

10 Toughest Interview Questions & How To Answer Them!

Heeey!

It's been a while I know. I hope this post meets you well, and hope we are all still praying for the nation and the world- with all the crisis going on- and have not given up hope!
Well today's post is about- UNEMPLOYMENT. I know how difficult it is to find work in Nigeria and other places and honestly, many times to way to go about it is is to just keep telling people you are looking for work and hope that you get hooked up soon, because it seems that online applications don't cut it anymore.
But when you do get to the interview stage, how can you ensure you put your best foot forward? I stumbled on this article by Forbes and thought I should share it with you. Hopefully it helps you or someone you know!

10 Toughest Interview Questions, Answered

Why Should I Hire You?
The most overlooked question is also the one most candidates are unprepared to answer. This is often because job applicants don't do their homework on the position. Your job is to illustrate why you are the most qualified candidate. Review the job description and qualifications very closely to identify the skills and knowledge that are critical to the position, then identify experiences from your past that demonstrate those skills and knowledge.

My thoughts: Sensible strategy- so check the company website for details on what they do. Most times the job application itself states what skills are required so it makes it easy for you to leverage on those skills.

 Why Is There A Gap In Your Work History?
Employers understand that people lose their jobs and it's not always easy to find a new one fast. When answering this question, list activities you've been doing during any period of unemployment. Freelance projects, volunteer work or taking care of family members all let the interviewer know that time off was spent productively.

My thoughts: Speak confidently and look them straight in the eye. You can speak of self-improvement books you have read as well.

Tell Me One Thing You Would Change About Your Last Job

Beware over sharing or making disparaging comments about former coworkers or supervisors, as you might be burning bridges. But an additional trouble point in answering this query is showing yourself to be someone who can?t vocalize their problems as they arise. Why didn't you correct the issue at the time? Be prepared with an answer that doesn't criticize a colleague or paint you in an unflattering light. A safe scapegoat? Outdated technology.

 My thoughts: Leave humans out of the gist. You can talk about new apps that could have made processes work, or that servers were slow. Much safer territory.

Tell Me About Yourself
People tend to meander through their whole resumes and mention personal or irrelevant information in answering-a serious no-no. Keep your answer to a minute or two at most. Cover four topics: early years, education, work history, and recent career experience. Emphasize this last subject. Remember that this is likely to be a warm-up question. Don't waste your best points on it. And keep it clean-no weekend activities should be mentioned.

My thoughts: I think it is safe to also mention any volunteer activities if you are involved in them. Answering this question required some practice.
 Explain A Complex Database To Your Eight-Year-Old Nephew
Explaining public relations, explaining mortgages, explaining just about anything in terms an eight-year-old can understand shows the interviewer you have solid and adaptable understanding of what it is they do. Do your homework, know the industry and be well-versed.

My thoughts: The question could be about anything- maybe "define customer service" to an eight-year old, so you need  to have a general idea of what the company does and select a few keywords that are peculiar to that industry and know how to define them as simply as possible.

What Would The Person Who Likes You Least In The World Say About You?
Highlight an aspect of your personality that could initially seem negative, but is ultimately a positive. An example? Impatience. Used incorrectly this can be bad in a workplace. But stressing timeliness and always driving home deadlines can build your esteem as a leader. And that's a great thing to show off in an interview.

My thoughts: Another good example is being seen as a perfectionist!

Tell Me About A Time When Old Solutions Didn't Work
The interviewer is trying to identify how knowledgeable you are in today's work place and what new creative ideas you have to solving problems. You may want to explore new technology or methods within your industry to be prepared for. Twitter-phobes, get tweeting. Stat.

 My thoughts:In other words, harness the current social media boom as a way by which a new trend can solve an old problem- e.g social media marketing, using Twitter or Instagram celebrities etc.

What's The Biggest Risk You've Ever Taken?
Some roles require a high degree of tenacity and the ability to pick oneself up after getting knocked down. Providing examples of your willingness to take risks shows both your ability to fail and rebound, but also your ability to make risky or controversial moves that succeed.

Have You Ever Had A Supervisor Challenge A Decision?
Interviewers are looking for an answer that shows humility and the ability to take direction. The anecdote should be telling, but it's the lesson learned, not the situation, that could land you the job.

My thoughts: Other than something outright shameful or irresponsible or stupid, feel free to highlight any past mistakes as long as you make sure you state how you learnt from it.

Describe A Time When Your Team Did Not Agree
Questions pertaining to difficulties in the past are a way for employers to anticipate your future behavior by understanding how you behaved in the past and what you learned. Clarify the situation succinctly and explain what specific action you took to come to a consensus with the group. Then describe the result of that action.

My thoughts:Can't say more here. You can detail how you called for a meeting to clarify issues, or sought superior help.


OK so I hope this post was useful!

Laterz
Fola

PS: The contents of this post was extracted from www.forbes.com.

4 comments :

  1. Amazing post dear! You have a wonderful blog:)
    What about following each other on Instagram, Bloglovin, Twitter?.. :)

    www.bloglovin.com/blog/3880191

    ReplyDelete
  2. Interviews can be nerve-wrecking sometimes. Lol

    Very useful tips, thank you so much for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Interviews can be nerve-wrecking sometimes. Lol

    Very useful tips, thank you so much for sharing.

    ReplyDelete

I'd love to hear your comments, opinions, suggestions, advice, whatever! So spill :)